Jim's Guidebook To Spain

You Are Here >>

Jim's Guides

Covering everything from BREXIT, moving to Spain, gaining residency, length of stay rules, healthcare in Spain, banking & insurance, Guidebook Spain is the best source for well maintained, accurate and easy to understand articles on moving to and living in Spain for the ex-pat and for anyone visiting Spain.

Orihuela online padrón

Print article Email to friend
0.00

Jim's Guide - Orihuela online padrón

INTRODUCTION

This guide is only for those who have an electronic certificate. If you haven't got one, then read my guide to the topic.

Having an electronic certificate installed on your computer or other device is the most useful thing anyone can do for dealing with Spanish bureaucracy, and saves a great deal of time. Where you would otherwise have to fill in a form, make an appointment, then travel to and wait at a government office to carry out a transaction, you can now do many things from the comfort of your home. For examples:

  • Access your catastral property details.
  • Access your medical records.
  • Change address with the likes of DGT, INSS, Seg-Social/INSS, and the police.
  • Check what points you have on your driving license.
  • Consult DGT to see if any fines have been issued.
  • Consult your tax records and submit returns.
  • Get an informe on a vehicle you are considering buying.
  • Get a nota simple for a property.
  • Make a denuncia to some organisations.
  • Manage bills and your account with SUMA.
  • Manage the powers included in a power of attorney.
  • Pay fees for certain transactions.
  • Register to vote in local elections.

In the context of this guide, more and more local authorities are expanding the number of things you can do if you've got an electronic certificate, and Orihuela is one of these. There is quite a long list of what you can do in the Orihuela electronic office, and I've just picked out those that are most likely to be relevant to forum members:

  • Sign on the padrón if you've moved from another location in Spain to Orihuela.
  • Change your data on the padrón.
  • Sign off the padrón if you're moving back to the UK.
  • Obtain a currently dated copy of your padrón.
  • Advise a change of your catastral data.
  • File a denuncia.
  • Apply for licenses or planning permission.
  • Apply for a resident's parking card.
  • Apply for a disabled parking badge.
  • Apply for a dangerous dogs license.
  • Register your pet on the Registro Censal de Animales.

OBTAINING A CURRENTLY DATED COPY OF YOUR PADRÓN

I've written this guide for Orihuela, as it is they who issued my padrón. However, over recent years, many town halls have considerably increased the actions that can be carried out online, to the mutual benefit of both the town hall having less work to do, and the private citizen being able to do things from the comfort of their home. If you need a copy of your padrón, check if your town hall offer a similar procedure.

A recently dated padrón is necessary for several procedures, where you are required to present a padrón less than three months old.

There are slight changes to the webpage addresses each time I access the system, so to be on the safe side, start here:

http://orihuela.sedelectronica.es

There is an option to change the language, but this doesn't change all the text on some pages, so I think it's best to leave it in Spanish.

On the bar below the picture of the town hall, click on 'CATÁLOGO DE TRÁMITES'.

This brings up a list of actions that can be taken. Scroll down to 'Solicitud de Certificado o Volante de Empadronamiento', and on the right-hand side, click on 'Tramitación Electrónica'.

  • Click in the first box - 'cl@ve'.
  • Click 'Access' in the left-hand option 'eIdentifier'.
  • Select your electronic certificate and click OK. Repeat that if requested again.
  • Put a blob in the circle to the left of 'Soy el interesado', then click 'COMENZAR'.
  • Enter your mobile number in the 'Movil' field.
  • In the 'Tipo' field, click the down arrow and select 'Certificado de Empadronamiento'.
  • Click 'SIGUIENTE'.
  • In the 'Forma de Aportación' field, click the down arrow and select 'Doy mi consentimiento...'.
  • Click the square box to the left of 'La tramitación de su solicitud...', to put a tick in that box.
  • Click 'SIGUIENTE'.
  • On the next page 'Datos de Identificación' should already be selected - green blob.
  • Put ticks in the boxes to the left of 'He sido informado....', 'Presto mi consentimiento...', and 'Declaro que es cierto...'.
  • Click FIRMAR.

The next page should have a green line with 'Su trámite se ha realizado con éxito'.

You don't need to bother with 'DESCARGAR RECIBO' as that's just a receipt for what you've done, and don't bother with ''DESCARGAR INSTANCIA FIRMADA' as that's just a copy of the screens you've worked through.

At this point you can close the webpage.

In an hour or so you'll receive a couple of emails. The one titled 'Nueva notificación' draws your attention to your 'Carpeta Ciudadana', saying this is a citizen folder in a web portal that allows you, in a simple way and without having to register, to know the matters that are of interest to you in relation to Public Administrations, for example the status of your files or the notifications and communications that you receive. It's useful to keep this in mind for the future.

The other email titled 'Notificación enviada' is the one that matters. Click on 'este enlace'.

As you did initially, click on cl@ve' and then on 'eIdentifier', which takes you to your inbox.

Click on 'Recibir Notificación'.

On the next page tick the two boxes and click on 'ACCEDER'.

You then see one or more download links - one for yourself, and one for everyone in the household who is registered on the padrón.

Download and print it/them and you have currently dated padrón.

You'll receive a final email stating that your email will be used for any future communications.

Sit back and congratulate yourself on not having to go to the town hall!

 

Orihuela online padrón

Jim's Guide - Orihuela online padrón

INTRODUCTION

This guide is only for those who have an electronic certificate. If you haven't got one, then read my guide to the topic.

Having an electronic certificate installed on your computer or other device is the most useful thing anyone can do for dealing with Spanish bureaucracy, and saves a great deal of time. Where you would otherwise have to fill in a form, make an appointment, then travel to and wait at a government office to carry out a transaction, you can now do many things from the comfort of your home. For examples:

  • Access your catastral property details.
  • Access your medical records.
  • Change address with the likes of DGT, INSS, Seg-Social/INSS, and the police.
  • Check what points you have on your driving license.
  • Consult DGT to see if any fines have been issued.
  • Consult your tax records and submit returns.
  • Get an informe on a vehicle you are considering buying.
  • Get a nota simple for a property.
  • Make a denuncia to some organisations.
  • Manage bills and your account with SUMA.
  • Manage the powers included in a power of attorney.
  • Pay fees for certain transactions.
  • Register to vote in local elections.

In the context of this guide, more and more local authorities are expanding the number of things you can do if you've got an electronic certificate, and Orihuela is one of these. There is quite a long list of what you can do in the Orihuela electronic office, and I've just picked out those that are most likely to be relevant to forum members:

  • Sign on the padrón if you've moved from another location in Spain to Orihuela.
  • Change your data on the padrón.
  • Sign off the padrón if you're moving back to the UK.
  • Obtain a currently dated copy of your padrón.
  • Advise a change of your catastral data.
  • File a denuncia.
  • Apply for licenses or planning permission.
  • Apply for a resident's parking card.
  • Apply for a disabled parking badge.
  • Apply for a dangerous dogs license.
  • Register your pet on the Registro Censal de Animales.

OBTAINING A CURRENTLY DATED COPY OF YOUR PADRÓN

I've written this guide for Orihuela, as it is they who issued my padrón. However, over recent years, many town halls have considerably increased the actions that can be carried out online, to the mutual benefit of both the town hall having less work to do, and the private citizen being able to do things from the comfort of their home. If you need a copy of your padrón, check if your town hall offer a similar procedure.

A recently dated padrón is necessary for several procedures, where you are required to present a padrón less than three months old.

There are slight changes to the webpage addresses each time I access the system, so to be on the safe side, start here:

http://orihuela.sedelectronica.es

There is an option to change the language, but this doesn't change all the text on some pages, so I think it's best to leave it in Spanish.

On the bar below the picture of the town hall, click on 'CATÁLOGO DE TRÁMITES'.

This brings up a list of actions that can be taken. Scroll down to 'Solicitud de Certificado o Volante de Empadronamiento', and on the right-hand side, click on 'Tramitación Electrónica'.

  • Click in the first box - 'cl@ve'.
  • Click 'Access' in the left-hand option 'eIdentifier'.
  • Select your electronic certificate and click OK. Repeat that if requested again.
  • Put a blob in the circle to the left of 'Soy el interesado', then click 'COMENZAR'.
  • Enter your mobile number in the 'Movil' field.
  • In the 'Tipo' field, click the down arrow and select 'Certificado de Empadronamiento'.
  • Click 'SIGUIENTE'.
  • In the 'Forma de Aportación' field, click the down arrow and select 'Doy mi consentimiento...'.
  • Click the square box to the left of 'La tramitación de su solicitud...', to put a tick in that box.
  • Click 'SIGUIENTE'.
  • On the next page 'Datos de Identificación' should already be selected - green blob.
  • Put ticks in the boxes to the left of 'He sido informado....', 'Presto mi consentimiento...', and 'Declaro que es cierto...'.
  • Click FIRMAR.

The next page should have a green line with 'Su trámite se ha realizado con éxito'.

You don't need to bother with 'DESCARGAR RECIBO' as that's just a receipt for what you've done, and don't bother with ''DESCARGAR INSTANCIA FIRMADA' as that's just a copy of the screens you've worked through.

At this point you can close the webpage.

In an hour or so you'll receive a couple of emails. The one titled 'Nueva notificación' draws your attention to your 'Carpeta Ciudadana', saying this is a citizen folder in a web portal that allows you, in a simple way and without having to register, to know the matters that are of interest to you in relation to Public Administrations, for example the status of your files or the notifications and communications that you receive. It's useful to keep this in mind for the future.

The other email titled 'Notificación enviada' is the one that matters. Click on 'este enlace'.

As you did initially, click on cl@ve' and then on 'eIdentifier', which takes you to your inbox.

Click on 'Recibir Notificación'.

On the next page tick the two boxes and click on 'ACCEDER'.

You then see one or more download links - one for yourself, and one for everyone in the household who is registered on the padrón.

Download and print it/them and you have currently dated padrón.

You'll receive a final email stating that your email will be used for any future communications.

Sit back and congratulate yourself on not having to go to the town hall!

 

Disclaimer

While we try to ensure the guides are accurate and up to date, things change and mistakes happen, so please consider this when using the guides.

Jim, the author of the guides, is based on Costa Blanca, and so the articles are biased to that region, although in most cases they are the same or very similar for other areas.

Newsletter Signup

Sign-up for our irregular newsletter and get the latest information on articles, updates and relevant features.

Don't worry: We'll NEVER spam you, and it's easy to unsubscribe late.
I have read and agree to the privacy Policy.
c. v1.21

About Guidebook Spain

Guidebook Spain is the complete guide to living in Spain for the British ex-pat and other foreign nationals.

Painstakingly researched and written by legendary ex-pat Jim Taylor, each article on Guidebook Spain covers vital topics for anyone considering setting up a home in Spain and those who have already made the move.

Jim's takes readily available, often complex, information and breaks it down into easy to read and understand chunks while drawing on his own experience as an ex-pat to add vital "real-world" advice.

Topics Covered Include...

  • BREXIT
  • Residency In Spain
  • The Padron
  • Banking In Spain
  • Healthcare In Spain
  • Insurance In Spain
  • Spanish Income Tax
  • Being a Non-resident In Spain
  • Driving In Spain
  • Buying Property In Spain
  • Spanish Utilities

Privacy Policy

About

Unlike the privacy policy on most websites, this one isn't copied from a generic template; it's been written from scratch by humans who have considered what modern websites do, how most people interact with them and what most people are bothered about when it comes to online personal data.

We've avoided legal jargon and covering every minute detail down to the nth degree. Instead, we've focused on what we consider to be the essential stuff and answering some of the real-world questions you might have.

Overview

We respect your right to privacy and will always do our absolute best to ensure we conform to not just the laws at the time, but also our moral obligation to you. That's why we will never knowingly allow anyone to use any data about you that we hold unless legally required to do so, and we will always keep it secure and (where possible) will remove all trace of it at your request.

We usually only hold names and email addresses you provide us. Still, at times we may keep other identifiable data about you, gathered with your consent, to carry out our day to day business with you. For instance, you might supply us with data as part of an enquiry, or as part of a purchase, or a booking process for a service, etc. In all instances, this data is destroyed once it is no longer relevant or required or held securely if it forms part of a service agreement with you or there is a legal requirement for us to retain. In which case, we can keep data for up to seven years. Like most websites, this site uses cookies (read more about them below) and also like most websites this site may share your IP address (read more about them below) with some online services. By continuing to use the site, you agree to this. We don't do either of these things because we're evil, it's just for a modern website to work the way most people want them to work, you have to! DON'T PANIC though, for the majority of users, you're not directly identifiable by these actions. Big Brother isn't watching!

Cookies

Cookies are tiny files that are added to your computer as you use and interact with websites. They are used mostly for good: To improve your experience, sometimes for bad: Search engines, Social sites etc. may use them to track what a computer (the computer, not the person) is looking at. Many like Google will use them to target you with adverts and for analytics, which results in them being able to build a profile of what you do online. You will get these cookies added to your computer when you land on certain websites, like Google, Youtube, Facebook etc. This site makes use of Cookies, mainly so we can be sure to only show you certain content once, for example, popups or reminders.

Cookies can sound a bit Orwellian and "Big Brother", but mostly they're pretty harmless and unless you land on a website that requests your data and you offer it, the data they hold is mostly anonymous, they don't have your name and email address etc. You can clear out your cookies by clearing your browser history. However, as we said, this site from time to time will use cookies (never for data gathering or advertising). It is generally good practice to install a cookie manager so that you can see what websites install what cookies, as most have them but few admit to it.

Cookies generally fall into three categories: Session, 1st Party Persistent & 3rd Party. A fuller explanation of these is at the bottom of this privacy policy.

IP Address

An IP address is a unique number that identifies your computer on the internet; it is in the form of 111.222.333.444. Lots of services, like YouTube, Facebook, etc., requires that websites send them your IP address before they allow sites to display things like embedded video, or Facebook elements, and so on. In reality, your IP address isn't personal data, as 99% of the time, you can't be identified by it. Regardless, some consider do consider it as such, so to keep ourselves in the clear we've added this bit to our privacy policy: On occasion, your IP address may be shared with some service providers. Emails Emails are typically kept until our inbox is full and we have a clear out and delete or archive all the old ones. We never use addresses obtained from emails for anything other than responding to the emails you send us. We don't harvest these emails for other purposes. Once we clear out our inbox and delete old emails from you, your details are gone.

Newsletter Sign-up

If we have one, our newsletter signup process is distinct from other areas of consent when it comes to your data and uses a double opt-in/2 step verification confirmation that complies with all the latest regulations (GDPR, etc.). It includes a clear indication from you that you wish to be added to our newsletter list. There is no ambiguity in our signup process; you can't sign up by mistake, nor can anyone signup with your email address due to the double opt-in/2 step verification. We record the location, time and place that you signed up. Removing yourself from our newsletter list is easy: Click the unsubscribe link in the newsletters we send or use the Unsubscribe feature on our website.

We don't share our newsletter lists with anyone else, other than the service we employ to send out our newsletters.

Data Protection Officer

If you have any questions about our privacy policy and your data, or would like to know what data we hold about your you can contact us using the details on our regular contact page, making the subject of any emails FAO: Data Protection Officer. We will then forward your email to our DPO who will respond accordingly.

In most circumstances, we will respond within 30 days.

If we suspect any abuses of this requirement (multiple requests in a short space of time etc.), we reserve the right to refuse.

For most requests to be processed, we will need you to provide proof as to who you are and that you have a lawful right to access the data.

Cookies: Further Explained

Session cookies

Session cookies are added to your machine as you surf websites. They are only retained for as long as your browser remains open. They allow a form of memory to exist between your browser and the websites you visit, such as pages visited, shopping cart contents, last viewed items etc. These cookies will remain after you leave the website but will be deleted once you close the browser (fully close it, not hide or minimise it).

1st Party Persistent Cookies

"Persistent cookies" remain on your computer even after you've closed the browser. 1st Party cookies can only relay information back to the website that placed them on your computer. Typically they're used to store site preferences to save you from having to re-enter information on future visits. They may also be used to track your activities (links clicked, pages visited, etc.) while visiting a site. Persistent cookies remain on your computer until you remove them, generally by using the browsers clear history feature, although other methods exist.

3rd Party Persistent Cookies

"Persistent cookies" remain on your computer even after you've closed the browser. 3rd Party cookies are typically used when a website has part of its content delivered via a third party, like embedded videos, maps etc. Sites featuring advertising commonly use 3rd party cookies to deliver the adverts; Overtime 3rd party cookies will build up a profile your online habits (websites viewed, links clicked etc. so they can deliver targeted adds. 3rd party cookies have other purposes too, for more information on this we suggest you search the internet for "what do 3rd party cookies do?". We try to avoid third-party cookies as much as is possible. However, we may, from time to time, utilise third-party content and cannot guarantee that such content does not have third-party cookies delivered with it. Persistent cookies remain on your computer until you remove them, generally by using the browsers clear history feature, although other methods exist.